Be and Let Be

Be and Let Be

We’ve accumulated millennia of philosophy and principles, of dogmas and history. We’ve seen science clash with religion and gained an enormous amount of self-reflection through sometimes painful confrontation. We’ve been given commandments, laws, rules, methodologies and all manner of tools for self-improvement. And yet sometimes all is needed for peace is just four words.

After years of philosophizing and ethical debates, the beautiful simplicity of these simple words hit me out of the blue one day. Hundreds of hours spent “debating life” crystalized into what I consider to be an easy to remember (and perhaps harder to follow) principle.

These four simple words represent the very essence of peace. When this tolerant and empathic principle is applied, the result is a reduction in negative feelings and a strong movement towards friendship and understanding. My life became more positive since I started repeating these words in my head before getting upset on somebody, or when I realize I harbor any negative feelings towards somebody.

Jupiter Rising by Flew Designs

Interaction and the Spectrum of Love

Existence is enriched through interaction. Any interaction, no matter how insignificant, gives birth to a relationship. There can be little argument that the most constructive (beneficial, pleasant) type of interaction is love. The nature, meaning and purpose of love has been debated by scientists, philosophers, mystics and all in between. Its overriding power has remained difficult to explain, even though many disciplines seem to think they have the right answer.

Most healthy humans yearn for love. In spite of this, in a large part of the world, few people venture to have a conversation about love or use “I love you” outside relationships with family or intimate partners. This is a widespread social problem. The results of this schism can be seen everywhere.

Many people today face isolation, unhappiness and depression. Without the emotional nourishment of love, it is very easy for entire social groups to become ideological prey to intellectual viruses such as consumerism, racism and nationalism.

But the culture of “I love you” is returning. Families are starting to realize that saying this to their children results in a happier family life and more emotionally secure offspring. Friends are rediscovering the value of sharing this honest feeling towards each other. It is important for people to raise their awareness of how love makes them feel, so that they more actively share and spread this emotion.

Andromeda

Because You Are Here

For years I searched ways in which to thank you for reading these words. To thank you for having been here, for learning the art of communication, for bringing the light of your consciousness into this world and for contributing to the diversity of this existence. Echoes of your choices spread across the Everything, gifting experience back to this Universe that gave us birth.

These sentences will now become the conduit through which I will channel my gratefulness for your being. You may wonder how is it that I can write all this to somebody that I perhaps don’t even know. I will explain by showing you my image of gratefulness, for it is this feeling that guides and inspires me.

Dealing With Criticism

Dealing With Criticism

Unsurprisingly, a web search for “dealing with criticism” will yield a lot of results. Advice and solutions have been explored and discussed already by people with a lot of experience in psychology and social dynamics. By going through some of the top results the reader is sure to find a wealth of useful information.

Rather than remixing bullet point lists and coming up with stale advice, what I’m going to do is to go back to the basics. This entry is concerned with the only thing which is really, truly important in the matter. And that is…

Perfection: Curse or Blessing?

Perfectionism: Curse or Blessing?

Professionally, perfectionism can be a source of great achievements. But the satisfaction of observing good results when applying this principle can quietly lead to a dangerous imbalance. There is a darker side to perfectionism, a way of thinking that worms its way into one’s mind, suffocating the creative process. Perfectionism can easily become too much of a good thing.

Balance is probably the most important mental aptitude when dealing with this issue. By knowing when to give up the endless quest for perfection, one can deliver impressive results in a timely fashion. But finding that balance can be an elusive task.